Public Spaces

Sea Turtle Nesting Season Continues, Season Will Extend Beyond October 31st

Although October 31st marks the traditional end of sea turtle nesting season, St. Johns County has four turtle nests on the beaches that have not yet hatched.

Therefore, in compliance with the County’s Habitat Conservation Plan, beach officials will continue to enforce rules associated with sea turtle nesting season, including keeping all vehicles off the beach between 7:30 pm and 8:00 am. Rut removal activities will also continue.

All Library Branches Closed on Thursday, November 4th

All branches of the St. Johns County Public Library System will be closed to the public on Thursday, November 4th for Library Staff Development Day. This full day of training prepares staff to continue providing excellent customer service to St. Johns County residents.

The book drops will remain open, although no items are due while the library is closed. Normal hours at all locations will resume on Friday, November 5th.

For more information, visit www.sjcpls.org or call Library Administration at (904) 827-6925.

Saint Augustine January Events

January 8

TWELFTH NIGHT BALL

Relive the old tradition of celebrating the Feast of the Epiphany with a costume ball at St. Augustine's Government House.  Participants must be dressed in 18th century costume of any nation, as well as bring one pot luck dish and wine, if so desired.  Each attendee should also provide his or her own antique plate and eating utensils.  Turkey, ham and punch will be served.  Festivities begin at 7 p.m.  Tickets are $20 per couple or $15 for an individual.  For more information and advance ticket purchase, call 904.794.2507 or email chkdale@comcast.net

St. Augustine's Famed Nights of Lights Will Sparkle to Life Nov. 20th

The 17th annual edition of St. Augustine's famed Nights of Lights will sparkle to life at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 20 when the flick of a switch will illuminate the oldest city's historic district with the gentle glow of more than two million tiny, white lights. Selected last year by AAA as one of the 12 best places in the United States and Canada to experience holiday cheer and named this year as one of the top 100 events in the U.S. by the American Bus Association, the Nights of Lights provides a luminous setting for an exciting agenda of holiday events and fun through January 31.

During the nearly 250 years when St. Augustine served as the capital of Spanish La Florida, the residents marked the holiday season with a single white candle burning in a window at each home.  Today, the Nights of Lights continue that happy tradition in a grand style that reflects the city's 445 years of history. In addition to the enjoyment that comes from strolling the ancient streets lit by the glowing lights or enjoying the nightly reflection of lights on the waters of Matanzas Bay, both visitors and residents can enjoy a wide range of memorable events, including:

Jacksonville Area Florida Department of Transportation Lane Closings

October 23 through October 29

I-10/I-95 interchange reconstruction project

Lanes and ramps will be closed nightly at various locations within the project limits from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. from Monday, October 25 through Friday, October 29.  Detour signs will be posted. The anticipated completion time for all work on this project is late 2010.

13th Annual Greek Festival Friday, Oct. 8 – Sunday, Oct. 10, 2010

Everyone can be Greek for the weekend at the 13th Annual Greek Festival hosted by Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church. 

Enjoy a delicious assortment of Greek foods, pastries and beverages along with nonstop entertainment performed by the Hellenic Band and traditional Greek dances led by the Nisiotes Dance Troup.  

There's even an Angora (Greek market)and Bakaliko (Greek grocery). 

Location: Francis Field

Directions: Located behind St. Augustine Downtown Historic Parking Facility

Hours: 4 to 9 p.m. on Friday; 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on  

Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday

New Blood Perks Up Florida Panther Population

USA Today - By the early 1990s there were only 20 to 25 Florida panthers left out of what was once a large and thriving population – and those that remained were sickly and inbred, destined for extinction within 20 years, experts estimated. So in 1995 conservation managers moved eight wild-caught female pumas from Texas to the area – a reintroduction so successful that between 1995 and 2008 a total of 424 panther births have been documented.