Environment

3rd Annual “Morning After” Beach Clean-Up

3rd Annual “Morning After” Beach Clean-Up

Keepers of the Coast, a local non-profit dedicated to promoting coastal stewardship and the conservation of coastal habitat, are recruiting volunteers for the 3rd Annual “Morning After” Beach Clean-Up on Tuesday, July 5th. The purpose of the cleanup is to restore the coastline following the impacts from July 4th, traditionally one of the busiest beach traffic days of the year. This community-wide effort will be held the afternoon of Tuesday, July 5th, from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at 5 different beach access points throughout St. Johns County:

Jacksonville's Water Hogs Let Millions of Gallons Go Down the Drain

Jacksonville's Water Hogs Let Millions of Gallons Go Down the Drain

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The average family uses about 6,000 gallons of water a month.  Each person in the house uses 90 gallons a day, and if you think that's a lot, wait until you see how much the water hogs in the city consume.

"Certainly we do have a set of residential customers that use more than the typical customer here," said JEA spokeswoman Gerri Boyce.

Well, what's typical for families in Jacksonville?

Most households are using about 72,000 gallons of water a year.

The top water hog on our list uses 1,489,949 gallons a year. That's 124,000 gallons a month.

"This takes on a life of its own when you're looking at these type of numbers," she said.

Many of the highest water consumers in Jacksonville live in large homes and gated communities, and none of them agreed to talk on camera about their water usage.

Wildfire Danger: How Can Parents Help Calm Their Children?

Wildfire Danger: How Can Parents Help Calm Their Children?

Massive wildfires continue to rage throughout Northeast Florida.  The chance of potential evacuations remains high.  Many children are seeing television or newspaper reports about the risk of wildfires. Because of these factors, the Florida Department of Children and Families is issuing expert tips from Child Guidance Center to help parents address their children’s concerns.

Lightning Starting St. Johns Wildfires; 40 Fires in Putnam County

Lightning Starting St. Johns Wildfires; 40 Fires in Putnam County

ST. JOHNS COUNTY, Fla. -- Lighting really can strike twice. Three new fires sparked in St. Johns County Thursday.

"Every time we call one out, we get two or three of these lightning storms that keep coming through," said St. Johns County Senior Forester Greg Dunn.

These new fires have each been caused by lightning, days after storms moved through the area. It could be up to a week after a storm that the firestorm begins.

Worse, forestry officials said the rain that comes with the lightning isn't enough to put them out.

"If it gets a half inch or even an inch on it, as dry as the conditions are, it can just be sitting there until the conditions are right," Dunn added.

In the Bunnell Fire District, which includes St. Johns and Putnam counties, there are 86 wildfires burning nearly 7,800 acres. In the Waccasassa District, which includes Putnam County, there are 90 fires burning about 8,500 acres. 

Viewer Video: June 16 Nocatee Fire

Yesterday, a 16-acre Nocatee fire threatened homes. Community member Ryan Frederick captured video of a helicopter scooping up water to battle the flames.

Fires Near Nease High, Nocatee Nearly Contained | SLIDESHOW

Fires Near Nease High, Nocatee Nearly Contained | SLIDESHOW

MORE: First Coast fires

ST. JOHNS COUNTY, Fla. -- Fire crews are fighting three fires in the northern part of the county.

Crews were near Nease High School in the northern part of the county earlier this afternoon fighting a new fire, but headed to the Nocatee area where another fire started.

The 16-acre Nocatee fire threatened homes, while the fire near Nease, called the Cummer Road Fire, was reported around 1:30 this afternoon. It's 85 percent contained and is located in a wooded area south of County Road 210 and west of U.S. 1 and is not a threat to homes in the area.

The school is not in danger nor are other structures in that area,  said Jeremy Robshaw, a spokesman for St. Johns Fire and Rescue.

Division of Forestry officials said that fire burned 20 acres, but has since been 100 percent contained.

Ant-Filled Yards Pose a Danger

Ant-Filled Yards Pose a Danger

With summer here and Jacksonville’s current dry spell, fire and pavement ants become a nuisance to gardeners, and even a danger to humans.

It doesn’t take long for ants to take over your lawn and claim residency in a home or business. Experts recommend treating fire and pavement ants as soon as they are spotted.